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The Isle of Man TT Videogame is frustrating yet brilliant – just like the real thing!

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The new TT game is one of the most immersive racing games you can buy.

Motorcycle racing games have been around for almost as long as the consoles themselves, and the allure of road racing has never been too far away from the thumbs of those gamers interested in the videogame racing genre.

However, in recent years it’s been the MotoGP games that have been the centre of attention for bikers looking to emulate their GP heroes – until now that is.

Because this month, TT Isle of Man Ride on The Edge arrived in an attempt to turn the Motorcycle racing gaming experience on its head. At least as far ‘on its head’ as a title produced by the same people responsible for the MotoGP game and using essentially the same engine can.

And, whilst many of the mechanics may seem familiar, it’s the Isle of Man TT Course itself that offers the actual challenge.

“This game is fantastic… And it will be 100% helpful for Isle of Man newcomers.” – John McGuinness

The concentration levels needed to lap the Snaefell circuit are huge, and one misjudged corner will easily see a rider end up in someone’s front garden. Just as with the real-life race.

There is literally no room for error and it’s this that makes the game so very, very addictive.

It’s likely that those – like us – that have played many of the two, and four-wheel racing games over the years will find Ride on The Edge by far one of the most difficult racing titles of all time to get to grips with.

Even with all of the ride assists sets to idiot-mode, the rear wheel will slide if too much throttle is applied, or if you brake heavily whilst leaning into a corner. All of which means that silky smooth application of the throttle and brakes are needed to make for a better ride – but if you over step the mark by just a single percent, you will slide off in spectacular fashion.

The game begins with a tutorial mode set on the Snaefell circuit to ease you in, but whilst all the settings are in easy mode, you can still expect to bin it a dozen times almost immediately out of the gate.  You will make use of the racing line indicator; which is a great feature that teaches you when to brake and which line to take through the many, many corners.

With tutorial completed, a time trial lap around the whole TT circuit beckons. Twenty-three minutes later, I had finished one lap and crashed a thousand times.

But this TT game is more than just time-trial laps around the Mountain. An in-depth career mode also features on the game – as well as online play. Plus sidecars are also going to be added to the game via a free DLC in May, just to add to the experience!

The career mode starts off with a rider buying a Supersport bike – from limited funds – but as you progress and earn more cash you are able to unlock all the Supersport and Superbikes. And if you’re not quite ready for the challenge of the IOM TT, then there are also nine smaller circuits to gain experience on before stepping up to racing on the actual TT circuit.

The races on career mode are split into either a time trial TT-style or a Mass start and you will need to be prepared, because the AI on the mass start races are incredibly competitive – and downright deadly – they will ram into the back of you just to add that extra pressure. At times it feels more like you’re playing Road Rash from the early Nineties than an Isle of Man TT ‘simulator’.

Hitting top speed on the Sulby straight and managing to get the bike stopped for the bottom gear corner of Sulby Bridge whilst the back wheel is moving around is great fun however, and leaves a player feeling like a riding God.  You never for a moment forget that this is road racing either; the asphalt is very bumpy, and this adds to the realism and will catch you out constantly.

But everything isn’t perfect by any means.

The handling of the bikes is often times ludicrously unresponsive, then contrarily slow and unrealistic; sometimes it feels as if trying to manoeuvre the bike around a hairpin, or styling out a flip-flop corner is just impossible. It’s true that you will probably get used to this inconsistency over time, but we’d hope it will be something fixed with a downloadable patch. Something that will also help fix the fact the John McGuinness is still sat on a Honda and not a shiny Norton too we hope.

Despite this however – and coupled with the sheer paucity of motorcycle racing offerings available – we were left willing the game to be nothing short of superb; even with the difficulty of the racing.

When you do get everything right on track, it is hugely satisfying.

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James has been riding motorcycles for 4 years, commutes to his day job on his trusted Yamaha Fazer and loves anything Modern-Retro and customised.

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Review: Pando Moto Boss jeans are the most comfortable we’ve ever ridden in

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Everyone makes abrasive-reinforced denim these days, but Pando Moto are quietly changing the game.

We’ve written about Pando Moto before here on MF. Back in January we were impressed by the quality of their offering – seen only through their catalogue – and their direction that seemed to be ‘making motorcycle clothing for real people’.

But is that promise kept all the way through to riding with them on the bike?

(Pando Moto wanted us to check out the quality of their new jeans, they sent us a new pair to wear – and keep.)

The first thing that grabbed us about the Pando Moto denim on the Boss Black jeans that we were sent, was the stretchy’ness of the denim. For those people who like to wear their slim-fit denim on the bike, but find the cut of most of them unable to keep up with the demands of fast riding, the freedom of movement offered by both the tailoring and the extremely stretchy 13oz denim was a huge benefit.

Armour is provided by knee inserts from Knox and there are hip inserts available too (although you’ll have to buy those yourself – they’re not provided in the box).

With a myriad fabric choice now being available in the ‘abrasion resistant’ arena, the comfort of knowing that your legs are going to protected by good, reliable DuPont Kevlar can’t be understated and – although thankfully we can’t vouch for their strength within a crash – the furry, yellow fabric is positioned in all of the right places and we’re certain that it’ll keep our skin happier than just wearing denim on its own.

There’s no denying that Kevlar is hot however, so whilst the slim-fit of the denim might be welcome, the lack of airflow and warmth from the kevlar next to your skin will mean that you’ll find yourself with a sweaty set of pins by the time you’ve reached your destination.

But whilst the skinny fit might make you a slave to fashion, the little details of the jean show that Pando Moto have thought things through with more focus than most; the one feature that impressed us more than perhaps it should have with the Pando Moto Boss jeans was the clever little reflective strip on the inside seam of the bottom of the legs… When you turnover the jeans – as our little legs AND fashion dictate is a must – that reflective ribbon provides a fantastic extra nod to safety.

We’ve spent just a few days riding in the Pando Moto jeans now, but we honestly haven’t ridden with a more comfortable, more pleasing pair of motorcycle denim than these.

Thoroughly recommended.

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Dainese’s 3D custom leather configurator is ridiculously brilliant!

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You too can design the best – or most hideous – custom leathers available.

If you were wondering why the quantity of articles on Motofire has recently slowed to a snail’s pace, you’d be forgiven for thinking that it’s to do with the fact that we’ve put the site up for sale.

BUT if we’re being honest, the last couple of day’s worth of articles didn’t get published because we were too busy messing about with Dainese’s new custom works configurator for their race leathers.

Seriously, go and take a look, it’s brilliant… And you can pretty much alter every component of your race suit.

Accessible via the website, the brand-new 3D configurator allows each motorcyclist to completely personalise their leather suit, jacket or pants in real time, with a simple, set of interactive toggles and widgets.

You can even upload logos and words.

Once it’s all done, you then just need to make an appointment with your local Dainese custom works centre who will then take your measurements and get you on the way to one-off Dainese suit heaven.

OR you could get the design we produced made in honour of Motofire and you’ll be well on your way to the Milan catwalks!

Source: Dainese

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