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Icon claim back the streets in their latest, epic video

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Street’s Not Dead.

Regular readers will know that we eagerly await anything released from the US streetwear firm Icon Motorsports. So the moment that a video drops from the Portland firm we’re bound to pay attention.

That’s an interest piqued double when they post it alongside what is essentially a call to arms…

“Street’s not dead. If you think it went away, you’d be wrong. Street’s still here undermining pompous authority, rejecting standards, and bucking the status quo..”

And they’re not kidding either. With the Icon clad rider thrashing their Kawasaki ZX-10R through city streets, car parks and even a public fountain at one point, there’s a lot to take in.

Couple that with their usual loud, Icon style and you’ve certainly got a statement of intent.

(Don’t try this at home kids).

 

 

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The Isle of Man TT Videogame is frustrating yet brilliant – just like the real thing!

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The new TT game is one of the most immersive racing games you can buy.

Motorcycle racing games have been around for almost as long as the consoles themselves, and the allure of road racing has never been too far away from the thumbs of those gamers interested in the videogame racing genre.

However, in recent years it’s been the MotoGP games that have been the centre of attention for bikers looking to emulate their GP heroes – until now that is.

Because this month, TT Isle of Man Ride on The Edge arrived in an attempt to turn the Motorcycle racing gaming experience on its head. At least as far ‘on its head’ as a title produced by the same people responsible for the MotoGP game and using essentially the same engine can.

And, whilst many of the mechanics may seem familiar, it’s the Isle of Man TT Course itself that offers the actual challenge.

“This game is fantastic… And it will be 100% helpful for Isle of Man newcomers.” – John McGuinness

The concentration levels needed to lap the Snaefell circuit are huge, and one misjudged corner will easily see a rider end up in someone’s front garden. Just as with the real-life race.

There is literally no room for error and it’s this that makes the game so very, very addictive.

It’s likely that those – like us – that have played many of the two, and four-wheel racing games over the years will find Ride on The Edge by far one of the most difficult racing titles of all time to get to grips with.

Even with all of the ride assists sets to idiot-mode, the rear wheel will slide if too much throttle is applied, or if you brake heavily whilst leaning into a corner. All of which means that silky smooth application of the throttle and brakes are needed to make for a better ride – but if you over step the mark by just a single percent, you will slide off in spectacular fashion.

The game begins with a tutorial mode set on the Snaefell circuit to ease you in, but whilst all the settings are in easy mode, you can still expect to bin it a dozen times almost immediately out of the gate.  You will make use of the racing line indicator; which is a great feature that teaches you when to brake and which line to take through the many, many corners.

With tutorial completed, a time trial lap around the whole TT circuit beckons. Twenty-three minutes later, I had finished one lap and crashed a thousand times.

But this TT game is more than just time-trial laps around the Mountain. An in-depth career mode also features on the game – as well as online play. Plus sidecars are also going to be added to the game via a free DLC in May, just to add to the experience!

The career mode starts off with a rider buying a Supersport bike – from limited funds – but as you progress and earn more cash you are able to unlock all the Supersport and Superbikes. And if you’re not quite ready for the challenge of the IOM TT, then there are also nine smaller circuits to gain experience on before stepping up to racing on the actual TT circuit.

The races on career mode are split into either a time trial TT-style or a Mass start and you will need to be prepared, because the AI on the mass start races are incredibly competitive – and downright deadly – they will ram into the back of you just to add that extra pressure. At times it feels more like you’re playing Road Rash from the early Nineties than an Isle of Man TT ‘simulator’.

Hitting top speed on the Sulby straight and managing to get the bike stopped for the bottom gear corner of Sulby Bridge whilst the back wheel is moving around is great fun however, and leaves a player feeling like a riding God.  You never for a moment forget that this is road racing either; the asphalt is very bumpy, and this adds to the realism and will catch you out constantly.

But everything isn’t perfect by any means.

The handling of the bikes is often times ludicrously unresponsive, then contrarily slow and unrealistic; sometimes it feels as if trying to manoeuvre the bike around a hairpin, or styling out a flip-flop corner is just impossible. It’s true that you will probably get used to this inconsistency over time, but we’d hope it will be something fixed with a downloadable patch. Something that will also help fix the fact the John McGuinness is still sat on a Honda and not a shiny Norton too we hope.

Despite this however – and coupled with the sheer paucity of motorcycle racing offerings available – we were left willing the game to be nothing short of superb; even with the difficulty of the racing.

When you do get everything right on track, it is hugely satisfying.

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Ex-Skully Helmet bosses theft claims ‘without merit’; case dropped

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Lawsuit against founders of Skully, the failed connected helmet-maker reportedly dropped.

The dream of an augmented reality projecting, heads-up display motorcycle helmet has been offered by a few companies over recent years, but there have been none more famous and fabled than Californian technology Start-up Skully.

Launched via Indiegogo in 2014 the company managed to raise $2,446,824 in crowdsourced funds to help them deliver their AR-1 helmet. However despite securing another whopping $11 million in additional investor funding, after much delay and negative press, the company announced in August of 2016 that they were closing; and that few (if any) of the helmets promised would be delivered.

Of the many reports with regards to the company’s inability to ship a final product, the most voracious and damaging of all where the ones surrounding the alleged misappropriation of funds by the two founding brothers of the company, Mitchell and Marcus Weller.

In a lawsuit filed by ex-employee Isabelle Faithauer who claimed wrongful dismissal, Faithauer filed a complaint claiming that the ‘Wellers used Skully corporate accounts as their personal piggy banks’ and that they had demanded that Faithauer ‘conceal the true nature of the expenses by entering them in Skully’s books to make it appear that the expenses were incurred for legitimate business expenses, which in fact they were clearly not’.

Amongst the list of falsely claimed expenses, the lawsuit detailed such payments being made on a variety of items, from Grocery Bills through to a pair of Dodge Vipers and a $13,000 trip to Las Vegas.

Once news of the lawsuit broke – and the details within it emerged – forums, message-boards and Indiegogo themselves were inundated with hundreds of customers and product investors furious at the alleged misuse of their funds; not to mention the lack of actual helmet that they had paid for.

Whilst it may not have been the absolute reason for Skully’s failure, there is no doubt that the negative press and legal expenses surrounding the case did not come at the best time for the company and had played a significant role in the ultimate closure of the business.

However it’s been brought to Motofire’s attention – via an anonymous message online – that the plaintiff for the case, Isabelle Faithauer herself has now withdrawn her claims that and has in fact admitted that her accusations made in the lawsuit could be construed as being ‘without merit’.

According to the document that we have been sent, Faithauer states that after her dismissal from Skully, Inc in December 2015 she was ‘upset’ and that during the discovery phase of her case by her attorney she soon came to learn that ‘many facts, documents, and information th’ uncovered ‘could lead a reasonable jury to conclude that [her] claims were totally without merit’.

She states that it is for this reason that she dismissed her claims against the Wellers in an agreement to settle for mutual release of claims. The document is signed 28th of December 2017.

Motofire have attempted to contact both Faithauer and her Attorney to confirm the veracity of the statement we have received but at the time of publishing have not received reply.

It’s another intriguing twist in a company tale and story that seems to refuse to lay down and die and whatever the truth, there is no doubt that Skully tapped into the desire for motorcyclists to utilise greater technology within their day-to-day riding, and that the heads-up technology envisioned by the company will eventually be developed successfully.

In fact, since the initial closure of Skully helmets, a new consortium have taken ownership of the brand and have promised to release their version of the AR-1 helmet – now appropriately titled the Fenix – in the summer of 2018.

Neither of the Weller brothers have any involvement in the new setup.

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