Quantcast
Harley-Davidson sales for 2017 are already down - Motofire

Harley-Davidson sales for 2017 are already down

The famous bar and shield brand is still struggling to shift the numbers.

In a company statement, Harley-Davidson have announced that their Q1 sales figures for 2017 are showing a 4.2% drop when compared to the same timeframe in 2016.

And the numbers read even worse when you take a look at their US-based statistics, with the announcement detailing a 5.7% fall in mainland USA sales over the period.

Despite this, CEO Matt Levatich appears to remain pretty upbeat,

“First quarter U.S. retail sales were in line with our projections and we remain confident in our full-year plan despite international retail sales being down in the first quarter.

We are very pleased with our continued growth in U.S. market share and the progress our U.S. dealers made in reducing their inventory of 2016 motorcycles in the quarter.”

ADVERTISEMENT

That reducing inventory quote would appear to be quite telling. With the news a few weeks ago of Harley looking to launch an all-out assault on the motorcycle market, some of this drop in sales could be attributed to dealers wanting to clear old stock out of their channels and Harley doing the same by actively reducing their throughput of metal into the distribution chain.

That said, there is obviously something not quite right with reductions pretty much across the board and Harley-Davidson have launched a list of five objectives that they think will help the slowdown;

  • Build two million new Harley-Davidson riders in the U.S.;
  • Grow international business to 50 percent of annual volume;
  • Launch 100 new, high-impact motorcycles;
  • Deliver superior return on invested capital for Harley-Davidson Motor Company (S&P 500 top 25%); and
  • Grow the business without growing its environmental impact.

It’s not all bad news though, whilst sales of units are lowered across most of the world, the Latin American figures are rocketing, with a huge leap of 24.2% over the previous year.

 

Motofire

view all posts

Join us as we aim to lift the coverage of motorcycling online. If it's bikes, then it'll be on Motofire. And don't forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube for all of the latest as well!

More like this...

Circuit of Wales MotoGP decision to be made within days Decision as to future of proposed MotoGP circuit will be announced on Tuesday according to government official. Welsh economy and infrastructure secretary Ken Skates has announced that the future of ...
Reuters tout Harley-Davidson as potential Ducati buyer With the rumours of a Ducati sale by Volkswagen Audi Group continuing, perennial Harley-Davidson are the latest manufacturer to be associated with a potential purchase. Harley-Davidson already have p...
Watch this year’s Pikes Peak live! Famous US road race will be broadcast live over the internet. To celebrate the 95th anniversary of the International Hill Climb at Pikes Peak audiences across the world will be able to follow the act...
This chubby little delight, is the PHAT SCOOTER Top speed of 20mph and a range of only 50 miles, but who cares? You know we love electric devices here at MFHQ, but even we have to admit that this might just be a little bit too niche even for us. ...
‘Miracle Mike’ the Indian Scout with NOS just won at Wheels & Waves It would seem that the 'Fast & Furious' method of customisation works a treat. After being revealed at the Art & Wheels show in Basel earlier this year, 'Miracle Mike' was built for one thing...

 

3 Comments Join the Conversation →


  • For years the only real option for cruisers/tourings when you wanted a U.S. product was Harley but now with Indian picking up speed maybe riders are jumping ship and heading there. I for one would love a Scout over a Street 750 or Sportster any day of the week.

  • Tony Preston

  • Andy Hornsby

    It’s a bit early to predict any sort of trend: the market changes continually, models change with it and then you throw a couple of controversial election results into the mix and you’ve got a nervous market who will keep their hands in their pockets and a fluctuating exchange rate that is beyond the influence of any manufacturer.

    What would be unusual would be if all of this crap didn’t impact on production of items which, in the modern parlance, are discretionary purchases :-)